Invalidating an election

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It should be added that, except for a short-lived presidential-preference primary adopted in 1913 (invalidated in 1916), the primaries in Texas were required by law to be administered and paid for by the party; most of the money came from filing fees.

Candidates for statewide office, including the legislature, paid

It should be added that, except for a short-lived presidential-preference primary adopted in 1913 (invalidated in 1916), the primaries in Texas were required by law to be administered and paid for by the party; most of the money came from filing fees.Candidates for statewide office, including the legislature, paid $1,000.Candidates filing for local office paid varying fees, usually $3,000 to $5,000 in heavily populated counties.In 1970 a federal court decided that the method used for filing fees was a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment.

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It should be added that, except for a short-lived presidential-preference primary adopted in 1913 (invalidated in 1916), the primaries in Texas were required by law to be administered and paid for by the party; most of the money came from filing fees.

Candidates for statewide office, including the legislature, paid $1,000.

Candidates filing for local office paid varying fees, usually $3,000 to $5,000 in heavily populated counties.

In 1970 a federal court decided that the method used for filing fees was a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment.

Runoff elections are held the second Tuesday in April.

The second primary had been generally adopted in the one-party states of the South in order to ensure majority elections, since final election in most cases was really determined in the primary and the general election in November amounted to little more than a formality.

,000.

Candidates filing for local office paid varying fees, usually ,000 to ,000 in heavily populated counties.

In 1970 a federal court decided that the method used for filing fees was a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment.

Runoff elections are held the second Tuesday in April.

The second primary had been generally adopted in the one-party states of the South in order to ensure majority elections, since final election in most cases was really determined in the primary and the general election in November amounted to little more than a formality.

Filing fees in 1995 were ,000 for the office of United States senator, ,000 for other statewide elective offices, ,500 for United States representative, ,000 for certain members of the judiciary, and

Filing fees in 1995 were $4,000 for the office of United States senator, $3,000 for other statewide elective offices, $2,500 for United States representative, $2,000 for certain members of the judiciary, and $1,200 for others.

State senators paid $1,000 and state representatives $600.

Fees for county offices ranged from $2,000 to $300.

The legislature responded with a law modifying fees.

The same court rejected this, and in (1972) the ruling was upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

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Filing fees in 1995 were $4,000 for the office of United States senator, $3,000 for other statewide elective offices, $2,500 for United States representative, $2,000 for certain members of the judiciary, and $1,200 for others.State senators paid $1,000 and state representatives $600.Fees for county offices ranged from $2,000 to $300.The legislature responded with a law modifying fees.The same court rejected this, and in (1972) the ruling was upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

,200 for others.State senators paid

Filing fees in 1995 were $4,000 for the office of United States senator, $3,000 for other statewide elective offices, $2,500 for United States representative, $2,000 for certain members of the judiciary, and $1,200 for others.

State senators paid $1,000 and state representatives $600.

Fees for county offices ranged from $2,000 to $300.

The legislature responded with a law modifying fees.

The same court rejected this, and in (1972) the ruling was upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

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Filing fees in 1995 were $4,000 for the office of United States senator, $3,000 for other statewide elective offices, $2,500 for United States representative, $2,000 for certain members of the judiciary, and $1,200 for others.State senators paid $1,000 and state representatives $600.Fees for county offices ranged from $2,000 to $300.The legislature responded with a law modifying fees.The same court rejected this, and in (1972) the ruling was upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

,000 and state representatives 0.Fees for county offices ranged from ,000 to 0.The legislature responded with a law modifying fees.The same court rejected this, and in (1972) the ruling was upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

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