Gay convict dating

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David Paul Hammer was a prisoner at Oklahoma State Penitentiary in Mc Alester a few years ago when he bragged to a reporter for an alternative magazine that he had received at least 6,000 from 1,500 to 2,000 people he had duped into sending him money.“The trick is making them fall in love with you through letters and on the phone,” Hammer told the Los Angeles-based magazine, the Advocate.“And I mean people who are lonely are so willing and vulnerable because they’re reaching out and they’re wanting something.”Across the country, prisoners’ ploys to acquire and psychologically manipulate pen pals--frequently homosexual men--have resulted in the loss of millions of dollars and countless broken dreams over the past 15 years, authorities say.“Often minorities feel we’re all in this together,” said the 55-year-old Santa Cruz man who asked not to be identified. I adopted a father or protector role.“I started out sending him money to get out of trouble, to get him out here to California, then to post bonds as he kept getting in ‘trouble.’“By the time I realized I had no more money, I had borrowed up to the hilt.”A lawyer he had contacted to help “Eddie” instead made him realize that he had been duped.After the initial embarrassment, he said, he was relieved.A recent episode of the comedy television show “Golden Girls” dealt with a surprise visit from a prison pen pal with whom one of the women characters had carried on a torrid correspondence, figuring that he was safely guarded.Such episodes can occur in real life and are far from funny, authorities say.Typically, authorities said, an inmate writes to his victim saying he is in prison because he made a mistake, is serving a short jail sentence and is financially secure.Then the letters become more intimate with the inmate asking for the pen-pal’s phone number and starting to call collect.

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In 1985, postal investigators found more than 3,500 money orders at the Mississippi prison with an altered value of

In 1985, postal investigators found more than 3,500 money orders at the Mississippi prison with an altered value of $1.6 million.

Some inmates also subscribe to metropolitan newspapers to contact people listed in divorce or real estate transactions.

“Inmates who are truly looking to scam a large number of people leave no stone unturned for a source,” Viator said.

“What I could not handle was thinking that this kid is going to go to prison and get raped because I couldn’t help him anymore.”The man now has a civil suit pending against “Eddie.”Viator says the scams are difficult to stop, partly because overburdened and under-funded prosecutors are unwilling to spend time and money to charge and try prisoners already serving life sentences.

In addition, authorities cited the relative ease of raising bogus money orders--the nation’s single-largest prison scam.

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In 1985, postal investigators found more than 3,500 money orders at the Mississippi prison with an altered value of $1.6 million.Some inmates also subscribe to metropolitan newspapers to contact people listed in divorce or real estate transactions.“Inmates who are truly looking to scam a large number of people leave no stone unturned for a source,” Viator said.“What I could not handle was thinking that this kid is going to go to prison and get raped because I couldn’t help him anymore.”The man now has a civil suit pending against “Eddie.”Viator says the scams are difficult to stop, partly because overburdened and under-funded prosecutors are unwilling to spend time and money to charge and try prisoners already serving life sentences.In addition, authorities cited the relative ease of raising bogus money orders--the nation’s single-largest prison scam.

.6 million.Some inmates also subscribe to metropolitan newspapers to contact people listed in divorce or real estate transactions.“Inmates who are truly looking to scam a large number of people leave no stone unturned for a source,” Viator said.“What I could not handle was thinking that this kid is going to go to prison and get raped because I couldn’t help him anymore.”The man now has a civil suit pending against “Eddie.”Viator says the scams are difficult to stop, partly because overburdened and under-funded prosecutors are unwilling to spend time and money to charge and try prisoners already serving life sentences.In addition, authorities cited the relative ease of raising bogus money orders--the nation’s single-largest prison scam.

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